Staff

      Bishop Clarence McClendon of the Inglewood-based Place of Grace says that while he is grateful that the Black Lives Matter movement has thrust the mantra of black lives into the national conversation, he believes there needs to be dialogue between the black church and Black Lives Matter and he is hoping to help facilitate it.

       “I believe that the prophetic community will welcome the Black Lives Matter movement,” McClendon said. “I’m not sure the Black Lives Matter movement will welcome the prophetic community, but I believe we are a voice among a multiplicity of voices that have to be heard, and I do not believe that there will be any substantial, long-lasting change without the prophetic community making the contribution to it.”

       To that end, McClendon says he is in the process of attempting to arrange such dialogues, though the pandemic has made it more challenging.

      “But,” he says, “I believe that those conversations need to happen and they need to happen now.

      “I have said it publicly, and will say again,” McClendon continued, “whether black lives matter to white people is immaterial to me. I understand and I’m grateful for the pushing of the mantra and the insertion of the mindset into the corporate consciousness of America, but whether black lives matter, doesn’t matter to me relative to people of European descent, because whales lives matter to them… The question is, is my black life equal to yours… because only if my life is equal to yours, will you take your foot off my neck when I say I can’t breathe. Only when my life is equal to yours, will what I say make any real difference in how you leave my presence and live your life.”

       He says the problems with movements is that they can become commercialized.

       “I see young Caucasian brothers and sisters saying black lives matter and holding BLM signs and do not understand the issues nor have a real concept of the substance.

       “I am not seeking reparations and have nothing against the people who are seeking reparations. If the U.S government starts handing out checks, I want them to know where my address is. But with the disenfranchisement that has been systemically perpetrated on people of color in this nation, this government cannot afford to pay me what they owe me.”